News

In the new study published by Thomas Wiedman, Manfred Lenzen, Lorenz T. Keysser and Julia K. Steinberger summarise the evidence showing that the affluent citizens of the world are responsible for most environmental impacts. However, pinning down exactly who is responsible is trickier than it might seem.   
In this Medium article, Julia Steinberger remembers amazing Kirk Smith: I admire Kirk for his multiple pioneering contributions to energy, health and climate science, and to his determination to criss-cross disciplinary boundaries as though they were nothing but threads to be woven together for greater knowledge. 
In a new WEAll briefing paper published earlier this May, Milena Buchs et al outline a set of ten principles for “building back better” toward a wellbeing economy.  “Wellbeing economics for the covid-19 recovery” showcases examples of inspiring actions around the world that are moving us towards a wellbeing economy, along with examples of actions…
Abstract Since the late 1980s, successive governments have increased the role of the private sector in the provision of basic services in the UK, particularly in England. In addition, shifting global trends have led to financial innovation, providing more imaginative methods of sweating capital assets and extracting revenue. As a result, the provision of services…
Is it possible to achieve a sustainable future where the social needs of all are met without exhausting the planet’s resources? Dr Julia Steinberger shares lessons learnt from communicating her research findings. How the UK compares to Sri Lanka in a study of social needs being met and planetary boundaries exceeded by researchers at the…
Individual or collective action? Snap! Tricked you! It’s a false dichotomy. The answer, as in most big challenges, is not either/or, but both/and. Collective action is by far the most important level (see parts 1 & 2 of this trilogy), but because we live in a world dominated by neoliberal ideas, where social connection is…